Alex Masters

Nicky Morgan on the curriculum, PPA and more...

From curriculum reform and PPA time to collaboration and RE, education secretary Nicky Morgan addressed key concerns during an interview with the TES. Here, we offer a breakdown of the key themes and links to our own relevant information and advice.

On curriculum reforms:

We need people to have confidence in the exam and that’s what has driven the changes. Now is the time to let the new curriculum and exam reforms embed; I’d like to see a period of stability.

On low-level disruption:

It’s about recognising what is driving poor behaviour. We issued further guidance last week on exclusions and have just launched a fund for the voluntary community sector to support and help schools across the country.

On PPA time:

There is no suggestion or talk in the Department of getting rid of PPA time – in fact, I think it’s incredibly important.

On teacher trust:

We want teachers to be respected professionals. I think teachers do an amazing job. I am under no illusion of the hours they put in. I don’t want teachers to leave the profession because they feel disheartened because of inspections.

On schools fostering better relationships:  

I have already come across schools who are working brilliantly together to try to become outstanding; lots of heads are getting together in terms of CPD deliverance and other developments. We see a lot of it [collaboration]. I’m not sure it’s something we want the DfE to be formally organising.

On governors:

School governors are increasingly important. People have busy lives – to give mandatory training and say you have to have it could put good people off. We have put in place improved government training and resources to encourage. It’s about making sure we are making the right skill set on governing boards.

On the DfE email:

We have cut pages of guidance but there is always more that can be done. I don’t want people spending hours poring over emails. We’re very conscious whenever we send something out, but we also have to balance that with getting the right information out.

On Religious Education:

We need to remember this is an academic qualification: the principal goal of that GCSE is to look at two religions – It’s important to make a comparison.

On the future:

We want to make sure we are working together to have the best possible education system. Going around the country, I have seen the passion and pride with which students and staff want to show their achievements. See also What would happen if Labour won next year?

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