The Optimus blog

The blog that inspires leaders in the UK education sector

Elizabeth Holmes

Refresh your school's CPD: top tips

Give professional learning at your school a boost. Elizabeth Holmes offers eight top tips to help CPD leaders refresh their policy and practice.

'Know how to listen and you will profit even from those who talk badly.' Plutarch

However successful professional and personal learning have been in your school so far, there is always room to push it a little further; extracting a little more learning and applying it a little more coherently. With this in mind, we offer eight top tips for even more successful professional learning.

1. Share a definition of learning for your school

Devote some time to devising a definition of learning for your school, if it does not yet have one. A school’s reason for being is directly linked to learning. This means it is essential for all the staff at your school to share a definition of learning, so that you are united in your work as a learning institution.

Remember, the definition must incorporate all members of your school’s community: pupils, parents, staff and governors should all be involved in learning processes. In particular, all staff should be utterly focused on their commitment to learn and develop from every situation they find themselves in.

2. Look for negative responses to professional learning

Take a moment to go through the evaluations of professional learning that you have received. In particular, look out for negative responses.

It seems that a lack of enthusiasm towards professional learning opportunities can be linked to perceptions of an increased workload. If there is a risk that learning is resisted for this reason, it will be important to refocus on it so that full benefit can be gained.

It is always worth being suspicious when professional and personal learning is rejected. Dig around for the true reason.

3. Develop a curiosity for professional learning

Explore what factors might be preventing a curiosity about furthering professional and personal learning from flourishing at your school. It is natural for staff to be curious about opportunities for professional learning.

If this does not seem to be the case in your school, or if it is but not consistently, find out why. A good place to start in this exploration is the extent to which staff experience wellbeing in your school.

4. Give school staff a sense of ownership of their professional development

Take a look at the inherent tension between individual and institutional needs for development.

There are multiple pressures on staff development, all demanding satisfaction. The task for schools is to balance all those expectations so that progress is made.

Making sure that staff have a central role to play in planning for professional and personal development, even when this is directly linked to your school’s overall development plan, is one way of retaining a sense of commitment and ownership.

5. Do an audit of the resources available to you

Do a quick audit of the resources you use for professional learning. Are you using as much local expertise as you can, to keep costs down and enthusiasm high?

6. Help colleagues assess their learning

Aim to help staff learners understand the subtleties of development. A great analogy is that professional learning is like sunburn: you do not know how much you have been affected by it until after the event.

7. Change one thing

Reiterate the ‘change one thing’ mantra.

After any professional learning that is undertaken, it will always be possible to make at least one positive change to practice. If this can be written up in a professional learning journal or reflected upon in some other way, the scope of the learning will be wider still.

8. Be a model of great learning

The more this can be infused throughout your school’s leadership team and the more staff can see that learning is something which everyone is engaged in all the time, the more fruitful your activities as a professional learning leader will be.

Put CPD at the heart of your school

Find out how Healing School in Grimsby redesigned it's CPD programme to help all teachers to continually succeed.

Download their case study to read about the strategies they have successfully implemented to ensure CPD is central in school life. 

 

Subscribe to Optimus Education's Blog

Join other educators and get the latest Optimus blogs direct to your inbox.
Your data is safe with us: Privacy Policy

Similar Posts

Verity Jones

Reducing the distance: are MOOCs the future of CPD?

Out with the old, in with the digital? Verity Jones explains why online platforms for professional learning have become so popular. Schools have to set a limit for the professional development of their staff. Even where they have joined forces to offer Inset days, twilights and the odd TeachMeet-...
Read more...
Sue Birchall

A day in the life of a SBM

I recently left my job as the financial controller of a multi-academy trust and returned to a more ‘traditional’ school business manager role. Or you could say I rejoined the circus. If I look up to the ceiling in my office, all I can see are a series of spinning plates that I – the school's top-...
Read more...
Elizabeth Holmes

Teachers: does your professional learning have purpose?

To guarantee the 'C' in CPD, teachers should always be asking questions of the research they carry out or the training they receive. Karl Bentley is a senior lecturer and programme director for PGCE 7-14 at Canterbury Christ Church University in Kent. After a career in power and control engineering...
Read more...